Floodplain Management News

Current Floodplain Management News and Bulletins:

  • NFIP Flood Insurance Rate Increases – Effective April 2017:  The NFIP recently increased annual flood insurance rates again.  Effective April 2017, most NFIP policyholders will see an increase in flood insurance rates of 6.3% to 18%, compared to 2016 rates: http://www.nfipiservice.com/Stakeholder/pdf/bulletin/w-16071.pdf

 

 

  • Palm Beach County, Florida:  In October 2017, Palm Beach County received its first new series of FIRMs since 1983.  Due to significant shoreline location changes, as well as a surge in coastal development since 1983, these new floodmaps reflect a large increase in “V” and “A” floodzone areas.  Property owners within these new “V” or “A” floodzones of Palm Beach County should contact us for a free cursory analysis to determine if a LOMR is feasible for the subject site.
  • Broward County, Florida  received brand new county-wide FIRMs in August of 2014.  However, no new or updated coastal analysis was performed and the new FIRMs are only based on updated hydrologic/hydraulic modeling and mapping (inland “riverine” flooding) and a shift of vertical datum from NGVD to NAVD.  Therefore, the coastal areas of Broward County – including the beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and along the Intra-coastal Waterway – continue to be based on inaccurate/antiquated FIRMs that include topography last revised in the 1970s.  Flood insurance premiums and new construction permits will continue to be adversely affected by these antiquated FIRMs.  Property owners within the “V” or “A” floodzones of Broward County should contact us for a free cursory analysis to determine if a LOMR or LOMA is feasible for the subject site.

  • Collier County, Florida received brand new county-wide FIRMs in May 2012.  These new FIRMs are very different from the previous flood maps.  Many areas of Collier County that had been exempt under previous floodzone mapping will now be located within Special Flood Hazard Areas (V floodzones or A floodzones); as such, flood insurance and land development implications will be adverse for these properties.  If the floodzones of the new Collier County FIRMs adversely affect your property and you believe the corresponding FIRM may be inaccurate, please contact us for a free cursory evaluation of your property to see if a LOMR is feasible.

  • Lee County, Florida property owners and developers are still dealing with the adverse affects caused by several new Floodways that were incorporated into the new FIRMs released in August 2008.  These Floodways are rendering development too costly or unfeasible in many locations.  If a Floodway has adversely affected your Lee County property, please contact us for a free cursory evaluation of your property to see if we can eliminate or reduce the coverage of the Floodway.
  • Miami-Dade County, Florida received brand new county-wide FIRMs in September 2009.  However, no new or updated coastal analysis was performed and the new FIRMs are only based on updated hydrologic/hydraulic modeling and mapping (inland “riverine” flooding).  Therefore, the coastal areas of Miami-Dade County – including the beaches along the Atlantic Ocean and along the Intra-coastal Waterway – will continue to be based on inaccurate/antiquated FIRMs last revised in the 1980s.  Flood insurance premiums and new construction permits are being adversely affected by these antiquated FIRMs.  Property owners within the “V” or “A” floodzones of Miami-Dade County should contact us for a free cursory analysis to determine if a LOMR or LOMA is feasible for the subject site.

  • Monroe County “The Keys”, Florida:  Through recently performed LOMRs, we have noted that many coastal “V” floodzones within Monroe County are based on inaccurate FIRMs.  These FIRMs, primarily based on outdated USGS topographic maps from the 1970s, are adversely affecting flood insurance premiums and new construction permits.  Property owners within the “V” floodzones of Monroe County/the Keys should contact us for a free cursory analysis to determine if a LOMR is feasible for the subject site.
  • Fraudulent LOMAs in South Florida:  Any structure developed within an “A” floodzone must have been elevated to or above the corresponding BFE using structural fill – or else the associated building permit would never have been granted.  When this is the case, a LOMA-F (not a LOMA) must be submitted to both the local Floodplain Administrator (FPA) and FEMA for review and approval.  There is also a review fee, payable to FEMA, for every LOMA-F submittal.

    It has come to our attention that fraudulent LOMAs have been submitted to FEMA on behalf of properties in the South Florida area.  Several companies (both engineering and non-engineering based) have submitted falsified LOMAs – instead of LOMA-Fs – to avoid having to charge application fees to their clients and to avoid possible disapproval of the application by the local FPA.

    Property owners please be aware of this issue and understand that if your structure was elevated with fill to or above any FEMA-established BFE, then a LOMA-F application must be submitted.  If you feel that the increased costs associated with a LOMA-F submittal do not justify having the job done, then simply walk away from the effort – do not accept having any company tell you a LOMA will otherwise suffice.  You should report any company you believe is committing this wrongdoing directly to your local Floodplain Administrator or building official.